external-features-of-an-apartment-that-is-worth-renting

External Features of an Apartment That Is Worth Renting

Put any house on rent demands that the tenant is satisfied with the features of the house. In general, the tenant would do well to inspect both the external and internal features of the house. This is the only way one would be sure about the state of the house. On the other hand, making an informed decision would be practically impossible without taking this step. Suppose you are looking for north end apartments dallas to rent, the following information is for you.

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Letters: North Korea, Robert Jeffress, Nikki Haley, SMU student newspaper, Dallas Convention Center

AP
We shouldn’t be surprised

Re: "North threatens to cancel summit — It isn’t interested in ‘unilateral abandonment’ of its nuclear program," Wednesday news story.

Kim Jong-un’s change of tune about further talks with South Korea and a summit meeting with President Donald Trump should have come as no surprise. What’s distressing are reports that the administration apparently was "caught off guard." Is it possible our leadership was beguiled by Kim’s charm offensive in South Korea, replete with smiles, handshakes, and gestures of good will? If so, it does not speak well of our foreign policy apparatus.

In baseball, a catcher knows he’ll receive plenty of curves from the mound, and he knows how to handle them.

Bill Corporon, Dallas

Jeffress’ behavior appalling

Re: "Texas represented," Tuesday news story.

It is appalling that Robert Jeffress continues to verbally spew his poisonous and hateful beliefs in the name of faith. It is pathetic enough that our president panders to the lowest common denominator of bigotry, lies, fear, lies, racism and more lies, but when denominational leaders of faith communities do not lead by moral example and dissenting courage from such behavior, then we are truly in a quagmire.

The fact that over 60 people were killed in demonstrations while Jeffers lavished praise upon Israel, and that he wholeheartedly endorses the president’s behavior, should give all people of conscience a serious reason to truly wonder what is happening to this country.

Rick Halperin, Dallas

Haley can’t even listen?

What was U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley doing? She says Israelis and Palestinians need to work together, yet she walks out of the chamber when the Palestinian spokesperson is up to speak. If she cannot bear to be in the room to listen, how will the Israelis and Palestinians even attempt a resolution?

Kurt Wolfenbarger, East Dallas

U.S. is to blame, too

In my opinion, the United States’ continuing enabling of the apartheid regime in Israel is only the latest chapter of infamy and human suffering unleashed upon the indigenous Palestinian people by a mostly white, Northern European colonial occupation begun at the end of World War II. The objective of the Israeli government seems to be nothing short of the annihilation of the Palestinian people.

To continually defend behavior that mirrors that which was inflicted upon Jews by Nazi Germany by calling detractors anti-Jewish is obscene. It is sadly not surprising that the United States, which has never atoned for its history of genocide of millions of Native Americans and enslavement of millions more Africans, would support similar behavior on the part of the government of Israel.

Rev. John D. Zeigler, Denton

Remembering a college free press

Re: "This is why colleges need student media — Fourth Estate’s training ground must be allowed to flourish uncensored, Meredith Shamburger says," May 7 Viewpoints.

As a 1954 journalism graduate, I’d like to add my voice to the letter writers responding to Shamburger’s article about SMU’s administration take over of its student media, The Daily Campus.

In the 50s, we met in post World War II’s left-over prefab classrooms. We wrote our articles on ancient typewriters, but we studied a free press under professional newsmen like E.L. Callihan and Martin Reese and the famous sports photographer Jimmy Laughead of Doak Walker photo fame.

We studied type setting, hand setting of the metal letters to produce a line of type, although the Merganthaler linotype machine invented in 1886 had taken over the typesetting art.

SMU supported The Daily Campus and used it as a teaching aid and an early example of a free student press. "Those were the days, my friend, we thought they’d never end". . . but they did.

Deirdre Brummage Day, Prosper

Save ‘The Daily Campus’

The independence of the press is critical to well-informed, thoughtful civic community. A collective of knowledgeable, well-trained and broadly experienced journalists, fully committed to probity, integrity and the determined and fair representation of a broad range of perspectives, remain key to the practice of a healthy, robust democracy.

As a professor at SMU for 28 years, I hope that the alumni, students, faculty and staff will rally to support the preservation of the autonomy of our student newspaper, The Daily Campus.

Students look to and at the leaders of their community — their mentors, teachers, administrators and respected peers — to uphold the highest values and model the best practices espoused by their university.

We all know and value the distinguished heritage of SMU. Now is the time to reinvigorate our legacy and assure that world leaders are indeed shaped by the valorous ideals of our well-esteemed and cherished institution.

Shelley C. Berg, Dallas, SMU professor

Thanks for the good news

Re: "Good things are happening," by Linda Gober, Tuesday Letters.

Thank you, Linda! So many wonderful things are happening under the current administration and they are being completely ignored by the main stream meadia. Thank you, Dallas Morning News for publishing her letter. Maybe you will take heed and start writing something positive.

Sue Reed, Richardson

People see what they want to see

I think a better fairy tale to consider is The Emperor’s New Clothes. Millions of people in this country have convinced themselves that the leader of this country has integrity, honesty and actually cares about anything other than himself. People see what they want to see, even when it’s not there.

Jane Fueller, Plano

A six-letter word

Re: " ‘These are animals,’ Trump says — Attack on Mexicans, government stands out amid full day of news," Thursday news story.

Donald Trump thinks immigrants are "bad people… animals." His paternal grandparents immigrated from Europe. Were they bad people? Several world-class scientists and mathematicians, including Albert Einstein, migrated from Germany during World War II. Were they animals? Trump’s third wife migrated from Europe. Is she an animal?

No, he surely didn’t mean these people, because their skin is white. We can be pretty sure he had in mind Mexicans, Central Americans, Haitians, Africans and Asians. There’s a six-letter word beginning with "r" to describe someone who thinks this way. You know what the word is, and so does Trump.

Roger T. Quillin, Dallas/Lake Highlands

Suggestions for the convention center

Plaudits and pans on the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center.

Plaudits: Beautiful facility in a nice, parklike setting and great staff who were very polite and helpful.

Pans: 1. Signs directing drivers need to be bigger and more numerous; 2. Inside the building, large signs on the upper part of the walls should indicate locations for exits, front of building, restrooms and concessions. With the floor crowded with exhibits, it is difficult to find those things. I needed a very helpful Dallas Police officer to follow in order to find my way out. Who knows what would happen in the event of a major problem like a fire?

Otherwise my visit to the center was excellent. It was good to see the growth in the downtown area so many years after I had worked in Dallas.

Hope this is helpful.

Tim Kirland, San Antonio

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College Graduates Finding a Stellar North Texas Job Market

College Graduates Finding a Stellar North Texas Job MarketResearch says what many in North Texas already know. The job market for college graduates in Dallas-Fort Wort is robust. (Published Friday, May 11, 2018)

It’s a big graduation weekend in North Texas. For many college grads that means a whole new adventure in the workplace. Those staying here in Texas are finding a job market with lots of options.

According to research by LinkedIn, Dallas/Fort Worth is the seventh-best market in the country when it comes to jobs for recent college grads. Austin is ninth on the list. New York City has the most job opportunities.

At University of North Texas, the end of college — is also a beginning. Not only for parents seeing their children off, but for business majors who graduated Friday; they are about to write their own story.

"I don’t know exactly where I’m going yet," said Scotty Cook, who is continuing his career in the Army. "I’m hoping one of three — California, Germany or Japan."

Cook studied entrepreneurship. He hopes to return to his home state, eventually.

"Most of the people I’ve seen have been Texas-driven," he said. "That’s just how Texas is, I think. It’s one big family."

Cook is not alone. Many grads say they already have jobs lined up in North Texas.

"There are a lot of jobs in DFW," said Marne Davidson. "So it’s not too difficult."

Davidson moved here with her husband to get away from cold Utah winters. She interned at a mechanical construction company here in Texas, which offered her a job.

"I fell in love with it and I’ve been hired on with their marketing team," she said.

Triple the surprise, then triple that surprise. Three moms in New York welcomed triplets at the same hospital, all within weeks of each other.

(Published Friday, May 11, 2018)

Imeon Holmes’ job search includes Texas and the Carolinas, but he’s narrowed his choices down to Dallas.

"It’s been interesting," said Holmes. "With my degree, you can fit into any industry."

The job market in North Texas, for these grads, is full of potential. They may not know where life’s road will eventually lead them.

But they appear to be on the right path.

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Eagles get tight end Dallas Goedert at No. 49

Former Philadelphia Eagles player David Akers announces South Dakota State’s Dallas Goedert as the Eagles’ selection during the second round of the NFL football draft Friday, April 27, 2018, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The Philadelphia Eagles and their former kicker stuck it to the Cowboys by drafting a kid named Dallas.

The Super Bowl champions selected tight end Dallas Goedert after trading up three spots in the second round to make their first pick in the draft. Six-time Pro Bowl kicker David Akers needled Cowboys fans when he made the announcement in their stadium.

"Hey Dallas, the last time you were in the Super Bowl, these draft picks weren’t born," Akers shouted before announcing the selection.

After trading out of the first round Thursday night, the Eagles gave Indianapolis a second-round pick (No. 52) and fifth-round pick (No. 169) to get Goedert at No. 49. The 6-foot-5, 256-pound Goedert played four seasons at South Dakota State and is known for his pass-catching ability.

"Dallas is a blue-collar kid who works extremely hard. This was a guy we felt dominated at that level," said Joe Douglas, the executive vice president of player personnel. "He can separate at the top of routes and he’s a guy who is going to be a friend to the quarterback."

The Eagles jumped ahead of the Cowboys with the trade, taking a player who could’ve been on their radar after tight end Jason Witten announced his retirement.

Goedert, who grew up a Packers fan even though he got his name because his dad is a Cowboys fan, said he thought Dallas was going to draft him.

"I think Philadelphia might have thought that as well," he said.

Howie Roseman, the Eagles executive vice president of football operations, said stealing Goedert from the team’s division rival wasn’t part of the thought process.

"We wanted to get one of the guys we had from yesterday’s list," Roseman said.

Goedert had 72 catches for 1,111 yards and seven touchdowns as a senior after posting 92-1,293-11 as a junior. He’ll team with Pro Bowl tight end Zach Ertz to help Philadelphia’s offense create mismatches. The Eagles released veteran tight end Brent Celek and allowed Trey Burton to leave in free agency.

"It’s going to depth and competition to the position," coach Doug Pederson said. "He’s a tremendous weapon we can utilize. It’s exciting to have a pick like this to add."

Goedert shares the same agency with Carson Wentz, who went to North Dakota State. Wentz texted him after he was picked.

"Carson has talked to us about him and he’s excited," Roseman said.

The Eagles didn’t have a third-round pick. They’ll enter Saturday with two picks in the fourth round and one each in the sixth and seventh.

———

For more NFL coverage: http://pro32.ap.org and http://twitter.com/AP—NFL

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Trump says that he’s set a date and location for landmark North Korea summit

President Trump talks to the media at the White House as he leaves for Dallas to address the National Rifle Assn. on Friday. (J. Scott Applewhite / AP)

President Trump said Friday that the time and place have been set for his landmark meeting with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un — but kept the world guessing for now about the when and where.

Trump also said that withdrawal of U.S. troops from South Korea was "not on the table" as he looks to get Kim to give up his nukes at what will be the first summit between a U.S. and a North Korean leader.

The New York Times reported that Trump has asked the Pentagon to prepare plans for scaling back the U.S. military presence in the allied Asian nation. Some 28,500 U.S. forces are based there, a military presence that has been preserved since the Korean War ended in 1953 without a peace treaty.

Trump suggested Monday that he was looking for his historic meeting with the North Korean dictator to be held at the demilitarized zone between the two Koreas. That’s where Kim met with South Korean President Moon Jae-in on April 27 — a summit that has paved the way for the U.S. president’s planned face-to-face with Kim.

Trump also said then that the Southeast Asian city state of Singapore was also in the running to play host.

"We now have a date and we have a location. We’ll be announcing it soon," Trump told reporters Friday from the White House South Lawn before departing for Dallas.

Trump on Friday also heavily hinted that the release of three Americans by North Korea was in the offing, but again was sparing on the details.

"We’re having very substantive talks with North Korea and a lot of things have already happened with respect to the hostages, and I think you’re going to see very good things. As I said yesterday, stay tuned," Trump said, referring to an earlier tweet on the issue that has also weighed on U.S.-North Korean ties.

Although Trump has placed considerable faith in South Korean leader Moon’s efforts to patch up relations with North Korea, the U.S. president has long complained that South Korea does not do enough to financially support the American military commitment. Still, it would be a quixotic move as he enters into negotiations with Kim.

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Eagles trade up in 2nd round to select tight end Dallas Goedert

Welcome to Philly, Dallas Goedert

The Eagles traded up in front of Dallas in Dallas to take a tight end named Dallas.

Got all that?

The Eagles came into Friday’s second round with the No. 52 pick but traded with the Colts to get into spot 49, just in front of the Cowboys, and selected tight end Dallas Goedert (GOD-ert) from South Dakota State.

In order to move up three spots, the Eagles had to give up the No. 169 pick (fifth round).

“He was among the players we had grouped at 32, so we wanted to make sure that we got one of those guys,” Eagles vice president of football operations Howie Roseman said. “And that’s why we made the move up.”

When the Eagles traded out of the first round on Thursday night, Roseman felt confident that the Eagles would be able to get a comparable talent with the 52nd pick, 20 spots later. But as the second round progressed, the Eagles saw names they liked come off the board.

During the day on Friday, the Eagles’ brass had conversations about the possibility of moving back up if it didn’t look like one of their guys was going to make it to 52. That’s what happened.

“We didn’t have a lot of picks and we didn’t want to go into anything next year,” Roseman said of the 2019 draft, when the Eagles already have nine selections. “We didn’t want to give up something if we didn’t have to, but at the same token, once guys started to go on our list of guys we were considering at 32, we wanted to make sure we came out with someone we feel really good about. That’s why we made the move here to go get Dallas.”

The Cowboys took tackle Connor Williams from Texas with the next pick at 50, but it would have made sense if they wanted Goedert. Earlier in the day, it was reported that veteran Jason Witten is retiring after a tremendous career in North Texas.

When asked if that was part of the reason the Eagles jumped the Cowboys, Roseman said they were just concerned about getting one of the guys they once targeted at 32.

After moving their fifth-round pick, the Eagles have four more selections for Saturday: two in the fourth round (125, 130), one in the sixth (206) and one in the seventh (250).

Goedert (6-5, 260) finished his college career with back-to-back 1,000 yard seasons in college. Personnel head Joe Douglas seemed impressed with Goedert’s college tape and his performance at the Senior Bowl.

“Dallas is a blue-collar kid who works extremely hard,” Douglas said. “This was a guy we felt dominated at that level of play.”

Goedert, 23, is the first tight end the Eagles have drafted since Zach Ertz in the second round of the 2013 draft. Goedert will help fill the void left after Trey Burton went to the Bears in free agency and after the Eagles cut Brent Celek.

Head coach Doug Pederson said the Eagles will bring Goedert along slowly in his complex offense but expects his new tight end to fill some of the void left by Burton. Roseman said Pederson was thrilled about the pick.

“I think you saw in our draft room, we were excited about it. That’s part of this moment. We sat down this week and just tried to make a list of guys we’d be excited to get. We want to come down after every pick and be excited to get him. That’s always the focus of when we go into these days. Excited from a front office/scouting perspective, from a coaching perspective. When you get that, you feel really good about it.

Having Sidney Jones lessens blow of small Eagles draft class
Eagles strutting around with Super Bowl swagger

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Deep-State Dallas City Hall, More Tenacious Than You Might Believe

One thing about segregation never changes: the money.
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Dallas City Hall is like Washington. We have a Deep State, and for all the same reasons.

A new regime is in charge here, too. It’s making big policy changes. Those new policies have serious consequences in the real world. Some people in the real world are very unhappy, so those people are looking for the soft spots, the handles, the backdoor accesses they need to defeat the new policies.

Is this about philosophy? Yes and no, but on the surface anyway, mostly no. The immediate battles here are about deals. The new policies are a threat to some people’s old deals. They just want to keep the gravy train on the tracks.

Coming soon to an airport near you – subsidized affordable housing! Because Deep State.

An almost hilarious — because it’s so stupid — attempt to do a Deep State end-run around the new regime is a behind-the-scenes effort gathering steam as we speak to get the city to build affordable housing at airports. Because, you know, that’s really where poor people with kids need to be, at the airport.

You think I’m making this up? Listen, I probably can’t even express to you how much I wish I were. I’m not. It’s surreal, but it’s real: Coming soon to an airport near you, subsidized affordable housing! Because Deep State.

We’ve actually seen round one of this publicly in The War of the CHODOs. CHODO is City Hall slang for a community housing development organization. CHODOs are nonprofit groups that get federal grant money channeled through City Hall to build affordable housing.

The CHODOs and some for-profit developers have built most of the city’s subsidized housing for decades in the city’s poorest, most racially segregated neighborhoods in southern Dallas. That pattern violates all kinds of federal laws and administrative rules, flies in the face of a recent landmark Supreme Court ruling and also doesn’t make much sense.

If you’re going to spend tax money building homes for people, hopefully you’re doing it to achieve some measure of social good. Otherwise, just don’t spend the money. But definitely don’t spend tax money to make things worse.

Building subsidized housing in historically segregated, very poor neighborhoods has the effect of tethering poor people to those areas. Especially for children, not much good and a whole lot of bad tends to happen to them there.

Dallas City Manager T. C. Broadnax and a top staff of newcomers to City Hall are proposing a radically new policy designed to correct past mistakes and also try to get Dallas right with federal law. Many of of those people bring prestigious credentials from posts at other city, state and federal agencies. The new housing policy they propose would be a rational analytical system, not a simple decree or fiat.

Under the old regime at City Hall, everything was good-old-boy. You got a deal because you were one. If you weren’t one, you didn’t get a deal.

Under the proposed plan, all of these investments — because, you know, that’s really what they are — would be carried out according to a rational framework that would aim to put new affordable housing where it will do the most good. That means almost entirely north, almost never south. And, by the way, I am hearing a whole lot of very interesting thinking going on, a lot of it aimed at avoiding the total gridlock and defeat that can be threatened by NIMBYism.

NIMBY — not in my backyard — is real. Organized affluent neighborhoods with political clout are going to fight some forms of public housing. That’s just how it is.

That does not mean a housing policy should be passive, crater and give into NIMBYism without fighting back, but less money spent fighting legal battles is more money for housing.

So, for example, one of the better ideas being floated out there these days involves building affordable housing on or over the parking lots at Dallas Area Rapid Transit stations. The housing wouldn’t be ramming head-first into established neighborhoods. A transit station seems like a convenient place for working and poor people to be near, although I admit that’s a very unexamined assumption on my part.

Another great idea is coming from the private sector and involves targeting some forms of affordable housing to public servants. Between the real estate market and the city’s pension problems, we have gotten to a point where too many firefighters, cops and teachers have to get out of town at the end of every day in order to live somewhere they can afford.

In other words, Broadnax’s proposed new housing policy already is spurring a lot of creative thinking, all of it aimed at ameliorating the deeply entrenched, socially corrosive effects of race and income discrimination and segregation. A growing consensus in the city sees solutions ahead to what used to feel like intractable problems. That consensus provides wind beneath the wings of the new regime’s ideas.

But, oh yeah. We were going to talk about affordable housing at airports, were we not? Where does that one come from? I can tell you.

CHODOs, by federal regulation, spring from specific neighborhoods and communities. The original idea was to foster neighborhood improvement through empowerment. The CHODOs are anchored to the neighborhoods that give them birth. Some of these outfits have done multiple millions of dollars in development business with the city over time, all of it in their target areas. Some have done good work in terms of construction, but even those good projects have had the effect of reinforcing segregation.

The southern Dallas CHODOs are looking at the proposed new housing policy, and of course what they see first is financial support being directed out of their turf. The reaction of some of the CHODO leadership, on view at a recent hearing on these issues at City Hall, has been to argue against some basic precepts of the new plan. Steering this important source of public support out of poor neighborhoods, some said, is another bitter nail in the coffin of the city’s most beleaguered neighborhoods.

That’s fair. That’s debate. That’s how we’re supposed to do things in a democracy. The Broadnax proposal, no matter how smart it may look at first blush, needs to stand up to honest challenge. Can’t argue with that.

That’s not what the airport thing is. The idea of building subsidized housing at an airport is focused on one airport only, Dallas Executive Airport in southwest Dallas, and on one agency of city government only, the city’s Department of Aviation.

Somebody thinks the aviation department offers an end-run around Broadnax. Aviation falls squarely within the city manager’s domain, but the department has always enjoyed a good deal of informal autonomy because it makes its own money, mainly from concessions, landing fees, rents and parking at Love Field.

It’s not just about getting out from under the thumb of the new regime. It’s a thumb in the new regime’s eye. It’s the City Hall Deep State telling the new city manager that people like him come and go but the Deep State is forever.

Because of its close ties to the airline industry, especially Southwest Airlines, the aviation department has always had powerful friends in its corner. Many view it as as a fiefdom apart and out from under the immediate thumb of City Hall.

The scheme to build affordable housing at Dallas Executive Airport, when it emerges more fully and gets fleshed out, will be a plot to build affordable housing apart from and out from under the thumb of the proposed new housing policy. Dallas Executive Airport will provide a haven for the CHODOs that want to keep doing what they’ve always done — getting money from the city to put new subsidized housing in already segregated areas.

It’s not just about getting out from under the thumb of the new regime. It’s a thumb in the new regime’s eye. It’s the City Hall Deep State telling the new city manager that people like him come and go but the Deep State is forever. Give the old patronage machine the time it needs, and it will find its way to water.

The idea of poor people living at the airport is only an opening move. Beneath it, pushing it along, is a rejection of the value of assimilation. Ahead of it lie decades more of racial segregation, rationalized and justified as empowerment.

Some people might even advise Broadnax to let this one slide. Let the southern Dallas CHODOs have a bite. Let them build affordable housing at a southern Dallas airport. It’ll keep them busy. Maybe it will keep them off the new regime’s back.

Of course, allowing this luridly stupid plan to go forward also spares the most important legacy of the old regime — the dual sets of rules, one north, one south. It’s always been that way in Dallas, part of the racial truce that defined the old regime at heart. But this would be the old truce with a new twist.

Under the original setup, before the Latino community was a big factor, the clear division in the city was between the old white oligarchy and the segregated black community. Justice, education, economic development: All of it was one way south of the line, another way north, based on race. Guess which side had the money.

If the Deep State stands and the old southern Dallas leadership is allowed to find a way around the new regime at City Hall, then we will still have a north-south divide. But different things will be divided.

South of the new line, we will have yesterday. The legacy of racial segregation will be reinforced and fortified, emboldened by its ability to flout the policies of the new regime.

North of the line will be tomorrow. Hopefully, the Dallas of tomorrow will be a city where people really are empowered, not by the false comfort of separation but by the challenge of full citizenship, full access, full participation, full and equal right to everything that’s on the table to be won. And guess which side will have that money.

So, yes, we have a Deep State here, too. The difference for me is that I like the one in Washington.

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Mavericks mock draft roundup: Which star big man could Dallas end up with?

The Mavericks will have a high lottery pick for the second straight year. Dallas won their lottery tiebreaker with Atlanta and have the third best odds in this year’s NBA draft. The Mavs are assured to pick no later than No. 6 overall.

Dallas selected Dennis Smith Jr. with the No. 9 pick in last year’s draft and should get another talented prospect to pair with him in this draft.

Here’s a breakdown of where draft experts think the Mavs will pick in this year’s draft and who they might select.

Luka Doncic, G/F, Real Madrid

HoopsHype’s Aran Smith, No. 5 overall pick (April 6): "Doncic is one of Europe’s top overall players, which is unheard of at 19 years of age. It’s no wonder why so many scouts in Europe feel that he should be considered for the first overall pick. And in a lot of drafts, he probably would be. His feel for the game is special for such a young player and he’s got a magical ability to find passing angles and make those around him better. He’s extremely competitive and clutch and never seems to get rattled or lose composure, even in the biggest moments. What he lacks in comparison to the other elite prospects is sheer athleticism. He’s not an overly quick or explosive athlete, so his ceiling isn’t quite as high as the others when you consider defense and ability to create and finish."

The Big Lead’s Jason McIntyre, No. 3 overall pick (March 8): "The hype machine will be in overdrive for months ahead of the draft, and it wouldn’t shock me if Doncic went 1st overall. The Mavericks have an awful roster, among the worst in the league. They’ll be right back here next year barring something lucky in free agency, but Doncic will contend for ROY and be the best scorer on the team."

Marvin Bagley III, F, Duke

Sports Illustrated’s Jeremy Woo, No. 3 overall pick (April 18): "After winning a tiebreaker with the Hawks, the Mavs have a 13.8% chance at the No. 1 pick and will be in position to address their need for a frontcourt mainstay regardless. With a major need up front, Dallas is looking hard at Bagley, whose offensive productivity, rebounding and athleticism were highly impressive at Duke. He has strides to make defensively and as a shooter and finisher, but Bagley is certainly an unfinished product with lots of room to grow. At some point his talent outweighs concerns over positional fit."

Woo’s previous selection: Missouri F Michael Porter Jr. at No. 7.

CBS Sports’ Gary Parrish, No. 3 overall pick (April 16): "The concern some have with Bagley is that his incredible production at the collegiate level was mostly the byproduct of superior athleticism and quickness when compared to literally everybody he ever played against — point being the 6-11 forward won’t be able to just physically overwhelm people in the NBA. Perhaps that’s true. But a consensus top-ranked high school player who averages 21.0 points and 11.1 rebounds in one year of college for a great ACC team seems bust-proof to me. Honestly, I’d consider taking Bagley first overall. And I’ll never believe he should fall any further than No. 3."

Parrish’s previous selection: Alabama G Collin Sexton at No. 7 overall.

Bleacher Report’s Zach Buckley, No. 3 overall (April 16): "If Marvin Bagley III hadn’t reclassified for the class of 2017, he’d be planning out his final weeks of high school right now. Instead, he’s surging toward the NBA draft with (ahead-of-schedule) freshman averages of 21.0 points on 61.4 percent shooting and 11.1 rebounds.

"He just turned 19 in March. During the same month, he also put 21 points and 15 rebounds on defending champion North Carolina, went for 33 points and 17 boards in an ACC tournament quarterfinal against Notre Dame and tallied 66 points on 72.2 percent shooting over his first three NCAA tournament outings.

"No freshman has done more in his freshman year than Marvin," Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski said, per the Associated Press (via ESPN). "He’s broken every record, and he’s really represented us at the highest level. I’m proud of him because he came in late and he adapted at the highest level."

"There might be questions about Bagley’s jump shooting and defensive ability, but he’s been a wrecking ball at every level so far. There’s value alone in his size, athleticism and energy, and he has the offensive ceiling of a focal point.

"That’s exactly what the Dallas Mavericks need for their post-Dirk Nowitzki future–assuming The Diggler does, in fact, walk away at some point. Bagley could be an ideal screening partner for Dennis Smith Jr., and if those two can handle the primary scoring roles, Harrison Barnes could dazzle as a high-level complementary option."

Mohamed Bamba, C, Texas

ESPN’s Jonathan Givony, No. 5 overall pick (April 9): "With Nerlens Noel unlikely to be in Dallas’ long-term plans and Dirk Nowitzki turning 40 in June, the Mavs will definitely be looking for a frontcourt player to build around.

"Bamba’s rare combination of length, shot-blocking instincts and offensive promise gives him one of highest ceilings of any prospect in this draft. Every team in the NBA is looking for a big man who can anchor a defense."

Givony’s previous selection: Duke C Wendell Carter at No. 6.

Bleacher Report’s Andy Bailey, No. 3 overall pick (April 17): "The Dallas Mavericks could go a bunch of different directions here. Dennis Smith has plenty of potential as the team’s future point guard. Harrison Barnes, in spite of the advanced numbers’ disdain for him, still has some value as a young-ish combo forward who can score nearly 20 points a game.

"With Dirk Nowitzki nearing the end of his career and Nerlens Noel and Rick Carlisle seemingly at odds, inside may be where Dallas looks to round out its core.

"Marvin Bagley III is intriguing as a playmaking 5. Jaren Jackson may have the most defensive potential. But the pick here, for now, is Mohamed Bamba.

"As is the case with most bigs, Bamba still has plenty of work to do on the offensive end, but he’s already unbelievable on the other. Jackson is the only player to have played over 700 minutes with a sub-90 defensive rating and a higher block percentage than Bamba. The Texas center’s defensive rebounding percentage is nearly 10 points higher than Jackson’s and over five points better than his total rebounding percentage.

"And the best Mavericks teams over the last several years were ones that featured a defensive anchor in Tyson Chandler at the 5."

Bleacher Report’s Jonathan Wasserman, No. 5 overall pick (April 3): "The Dallas Mavericks have been noncommittal with Nerlens Noel and could look at Mohamed Bamba to anchor their defense.

"Bamba has the potential to change a game with his length in the paint like Rudy Gobert, and he’d give Dennis Smith Jr. an enormous finishing target at the rim, where he shot 74.5 percent.

"At Texas, he flashed glimpses of an over-the-shoulder game and jump shot, but those are the skills he’ll have to improve, along with his body.

"Michael Porter Jr. will get consideration, but between the back surgery and poor performances after returning to Missouri, Dallas should feel more confident in Bamba’s unique defensive presence."

Wasserman’s previous selection: Real Madrid G/F Luka Doncic at No. 1.

Fan Rag Sports’ Daniel O’Brien, No. 5 overall pick (March 30): "The Longhorns’ one-and-done center is a risk-reward commodity, especially on the offensive end. His possible range of outcomes is vast on that end. On defense, however, his floor is high and his ceiling is astronomical.

"He averaged 4.8 blocks and just 3.4 fouls per 40 minutes this season, and opponents scored just 89.7 points per 100 possessions when he was on the floor. His mobility and long reach form a wall around the rim unlike any other prospect.

"The Mavericks will be targeting him high, but he shouldn’t be considered an immediate savior. He will need a couple of years of growing pains before he starts approaching his prime."

O’Brien’s previous selection: Duke F Marvin Bagley III at No. 5.

UPROXX’s Brad Rowland, No. 5 overall pick (March 26): "Bamba’s defensive tools are ridiculous and everybody knows it. If anything, he remains underrated at this juncture as a result of playing on an underwhelming Texas team. Playing in Dallas could give him the chance to unlock some of his offensive potential as well. There is some risk here but nothing that the Mavs couldn’t rationalize."

The Ringer’s Jonathan Tjarks, Kevin O’Connor and Danny Chau, No. 5 overall pick (March 2): "This is a conspiracy. Tjarks clearly selected Jackson with the fourth pick just so Bamba could fall to his hometown team. As an athletic lob threat and rim protector with a 9-foot-6 standing reach, Bamba is a perfect fit for Rick Carlisle’s offensive system. Dennis Smith repeatedly running high pick-and-rolls with Bamba would be pretty freaking invigorating. If Bamba’s perimeter shot translates, he could end up the best player in the draft."

CBS Sports’ Reid Forgrave, No. 6 overall pick (March 22): "I believe every player in this mock draft, one through six, and maybe even later, would have been the top-rated player in last season’s draft. While the 2017 draft was marked by its depth, this draft is marked by its stacked top. Porter was my top pick in the preseason. The back surgery makes him too much of an injury risk to take over the handful of other guarantees in this draft, but Porter’s ceiling is high, high, high. Maybe not Kevin Durant, but Porter is a natural scorer. Think of him in the mold of Jayson Tatum, just a tick more talented, a tick bigger, a tick better of a scorer. You could even toss in a little bit of Dirk here. I’ve heard some people say that since Porter’s two-game return from back surgery in March was so disappointing, NBA general managers will knock him for it. That’s nonsense. Scouts have seen Porter’s dynamic offensive game for years; they’re not going to judge him poorly for two subpar collegiate games when he didn’t appear quite physically ready to return."

Forgrave’s previous selection: Michigan State C Jaren Jackson Jr. at No. 7.

SB Nation’s Ricky O’Donnell, No. 3 overall pick (April 12): "Jackson didn’t put up gaudy stats like Ayton or Bagley, only averaging 11 points and 5.8 rebounds per game. He wasn’t even on the floor much in Michigan State’s NCAA tournament loss to Syracuse (yes, that was a problem). He’s not a ready-made contributor yet, either, entering this draft as one of the youngest players in the class. Still: Jackson’s combination of shot blocking and three-point shooting is a perfect fit for the modern NBA. No other big man in this draft can match him in those two areas. For a patient team, Jackson could be a gem down the line."

O’Donnell’s previous selection: Duke F Marvin Bagley III at No. 4.

Sporting News’ Chris Stone, No. 3 overall pick (April 18): "The Mavericks won a coin flip against the Hawks for the third spot on Friday. The two teams will split ping pong balls and have virtually equal lottery odds, but if things fall in line, it’ll be Dallas who selects first on draft night.

"Jackson is one of the youngest prospects in the 2018 draft class and his statistical profile — in part due to his age — is one of the most promising. The 18-year-old averaged 5.5 blocks per 40 minutes as a freshman while shooting 39.6 percent from behind the arc. He has legitimate unicorn potential. Turning him into a long-term ball screen partner with Dennis Smith Jr. would be a terrific move for a franchise looking to bring back its glory days."

Stone’s previous selection: Texas C Mohamed Bamba at No. 5.

Yahoo Sports’ Jordan Schlutz, No. 5 overall pick (April 6): "The youth movement continues for the Mavs. Jackson, a 6-10 jumping jack, is an ideal complement to Dennis Smith Jr. because of his dexterity, quickness and ability to pick-and-pop. As a freshman, he connected on 40 percent of his threes, and his defensive flexibility is a huge plus for a Dallas team that lacks an identity."

The Athletic’s Sam Vecenie, No. 4 overall pick (March 28): "Jackson was pretty awful in both of Michigan State’s NCAA Tournament games (by his lofty standards). He averaged four points, six rebounds and a block, and displayed some of the general weaknesses that give scouts pause when evaluating him. While his feel on the defensive end is quite strong, his offensive feel isn’t quite there yet. He struggles with double teams and turnovers, and isn’t a natural passer. Still, he’s the best defensive prospect in the class as a shot-blocking savant, he knocks down shots from distance with terrific touch and he’d fit nicely with Dallas as it transitions out of the Dirk Nowitzki era and into something new under Rick Carlisle."

Vecenie’s previous selection: Real Madrid G/F Luka Doncic at No. 2.

NBADraft.net, No. 3 overall pick (April 12)

NBADraft.net’s previous selection: Real Madrid G/F Luka Doncic.

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Dallas politician says ‘illegal immigrants’ to blame for city’s middle class problem

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J.J. Koch, who has a high chance of becoming the next sole Republican on the Dallas County commissioners court, says that blame for the city’s declining middle class falls in large part on one group: unauthorized immigrants.

They make up roughly 7 percent of the county, according to the Pew Research Center, but Koch believes they have put an outsize burden on public schools, social services and the economy.

"This shrinking of the middle class won’t stop until we end the flow of illegal immigrants into our County," Koch said Thursday in a campaign email to his supporters. "That time-tested formula for achieving the American dream will end in Dallas County if we don’t take immediate action to change course and enforce our laws."

Koch, a Dallas attorney, led the Republican primary for northern Dallas County’s District 2, which has long leaned Republican. He faces former State District Judge Vickers "Vic" Cunningham in the runoff election on May 22. As county commissioner, Koch would not have much power over immigration, besides oversight of the county jail which already hands over unauthorized immigrants to the federal government.

Some saw Koch’s mailer as purely political — trying to capitalize on the widespread concerns about unauthorized immigration that helped propel Donald Trump to the presidency.

"It is disappointing to see this sort of fear-mongering from someone who wants to serve on the Commissioners Court," said Commissioner Elba Garcia, herself a Mexican immigrant. "County governance is about management — competent administration and prudent stewardship of taxpayers’ dollars, not partisan grandstanding."

Koch was weighing in on a new report out this week by the Center for Public Policy Priorities that showed rising poverty and racial inequality in Dallas County. One key statistic: Median household income fell by 16 percent since 1999, the report found.

"What has changed since the rise in poverty?" Koch said in the email. "The answer is hidden in their own chart," he said, referring to a graph that showed the county population growing far less white and far more Hispanic over time.

By 2050, Dallas County will have 1.9 million Hispanics, 404,000 whites, 641,500 blacks and 300,000 people of other races, the report said. Koch took issue with the report not differentiating between all Hispanic people and unauthorized immigrants.

Koch said unauthorized immigrants fuel economic woes because they burden public schools with more poor students and non-English speakers. He said such immigrants also accept jobs for lower wages, which leads to salaries falling for other similar jobs. And he added, those issues lead to more "not just white flight, but middle-class flight" to the suburbs.

"People immediately say, ‘You’re being racist,’ but clearly this has nothing to do with racial origin," Koch said. "It has to do with: a bunch of poor people came over the border and settled here in Dallas."

Dallas attorney J.J. Koch, center, answers questions in an editorial board meeting as former Garland City Council member Stephen Stanley (left) listens and former state District Judge Vickers "Vic" Cunningham (right) takes notes at The Dallas Morning News in Dallas on Friday, February 9, 2018. All were running for the Republican nomination for Dallas County commissioner in District 2. (Vernon Bryant/The Dallas Morning News)

He added that unauthorized immigrants use social services and resources that would be better spent on native-born people living in poverty.

"If we want to be really honest about it, illegal immigrants are taking away resources that we could use to create a strong, thriving black middle class in Dallas County," Koch said.

In response, Commissioner Garcia said that immigration "is one of the great strengths of our economy in North Texas." The county’s unauthorized immigrants work in construction, manufacturing and service industries, and 34 percent are homeowners, she said.

Citing a 2016 study by the Texas Public Policy Foundation, she said unauthorized residents in Texas paid $178 million in property taxes and $1.4 billion in sales taxes in 2010.

"This shows that undocumented residents of Dallas County contribute to the economy of our community with both their labor and their disposable income, as well as being part of our community tax base," Garcia said.

Garcia added that the middle class in Dallas is most hurt by the rise in housing prices coupled with relatively unchanged wages.

"I do not believe that either of these issues is caused or exacerbated by undocumented immigrants," Garcia said.

Hector Flores, the former president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, said immigrants often take jobs that are dangerous, pay little and offer no benefits. Citizens wouldn’t work those jobs, he said.

"He’s trying to race-bait," Flores said of Koch. "He’s trying to duplicate the GOP plan that got our POTUS into office by arousing the darker side of Americans."

In his email, Koch called himself "the only candidate openly committed to enforcing the rule of law"and "the only candidate who understands the magnitude of this issue and has the courage to take it head on."

His opponent, Cunningham, brushed that off as "more big talk from Mr. No Experience."

"As a State Criminal District Judge, I worked with ICE on a regular basis deporting criminal illegal aliens," Cunningham said. "As county commissioner I will fight against sanctuary cities and will always uphold the rule of law, just as I have always done during my 30 year career in criminal justice."

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Mavericks mock draft roundup: Could Dallas end up with a star big man from Texas or Duke?

It appears the Mavericks will have a high lottery pick for the second straight year. Dallas selected Dennis Smith Jr. with the No. 9 pick in last year’s draft and should get another talented prospect to pair with him in this draft.

If the Mavs continue at this pace, they should have a top five pick. Check out where the Mavs stand in the lottery race right here.

Here’s a breakdown of where draft experts think the Mavs will pick in this year’s draft and who they might select.

Luka Doncic, G/F, Real Madrid

HoopsHype’s Aran Smith, No. 5 overall pick (April 6): "Doncic is one of Europe’s top overall players, which is unheard of at 19 years of age. It’s no wonder why so many scouts in Europe feel that he should be considered for the first overall pick. And in a lot of drafts, he probably would be. His feel for the game is special for such a young player and he’s got a magical ability to find passing angles and make those around him better. He’s extremely competitive and clutch and never seems to get rattled or lose composure, even in the biggest moments. What he lacks in comparison to the other elite prospects is sheer athleticism. He’s not an overly quick or explosive athlete, so his ceiling isn’t quite as high as the others when you consider defense and ability to create and finish."

The Big Lead’s Jason McIntyre, No. 3 overall pick (March 8): "The hype machine will be in overdrive for months ahead of the draft, and it wouldn’t shock me if Doncic went 1st overall. The Mavericks have an awful roster, among the worst in the league. They’ll be right back here next year barring something lucky in free agency, but Doncic will contend for ROY and be the best scorer on the team."

NBADraft.net, No. 5 overall pick (March 29)

NBADraft.net’s previous selection: Duke F Marvin Bagley III at No. 3.

Marvin Bagley III, F, Duke

Sports Illustrated’s Jeremy Woo, No. 5 overall pick (April 3): "Should Bagley fall here he’d offer strong value, and would be a fascinating frontcourt complement to Dennis Smith in Dallas. He was picked apart by critics as the season went on, but Bagley’s athleticism, offensive potential and rebounding ability give him a strong upside. He can be a ball-watcher on defense and his interior play can be predictable, but at some point there’s no sense looking past his production. Bagley’s best NBA position is probably going to be power forward, but he will need to keep improving as a jump shooter to make that happen. He’s still a very good prospect, and deserves some patience."

Woo’s previous selection: Missouri F Michael Porter Jr. at No. 7.

Bleacher Report’s Zach Buckley, No. 3 overall (April 9): "If Marvin Bagley III hadn’t reclassified for the class of 2017, he’d be planning out his final weeks of high school right now. Instead, he’s surging toward the NBA draft with (ahead-of-schedule) freshman averages of 21.0 points on 61.4 percent shooting and 11.1 rebounds.

"He just turned 19 in March. During the same month, he also put 21 points and 15 rebounds on defending champion North Carolina, went for 33 points and 17 boards in an ACC tournament quarterfinal against Notre Dame and tallied 66 points on 72.2 percent shooting over his first three NCAA tournament outings.

"No freshman has done more in his freshman year than Marvin," Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski said, per the Associated Press (via ESPN). "He’s broken every record, and he’s really represented us at the highest level. I’m proud of him because he came in late and he adapted at the highest level."

"There might be questions about Bagley’s jump shooting and defensive ability, but he’s been a wrecking ball at every level so far. There’s value alone in his size, athleticism and energy, and he has the offensive ceiling of a focal point.

"That’s exactly what the Dallas Mavericks need for their post-Dirk Nowitzki future–assuming The Diggler does, in fact, walk away at some point. Bagley could be an ideal screening partner for Dennis Smith Jr., and if those two can handle the primary scoring roles, Harrison Barnes could dazzle as a high-level complementary option."

SB Nation’s Ricky O’Donnell and Matt Ellentuck, No. 4 overall (March 28): "Bagley is so skilled at scoring around the basket. He was unstoppable with one-on-one coverage all year, using a variety of tricks to average 20 points per game in his true freshman season for Duke.

"The question is whether he blocks enough shots to be a center or has the type of perimeter game the modern four now demands.

"A bet on Bagley comes with the idea that he’s just scratching the surface of his skill level. He’s shooting 36 percent from three-point range on 50 attempts this season, but he’s only a 62-percent free-throw shooter. You can see the outline of a playmaking big man who can attack off the dribble for himself and others, but his feel and handle are still developing.

"Finding the right team will be as important with Bagley as any prospect. Bagley is not a shot blocker and he doesn’t have strong defensive instincts right now. He needs a defensive anchor next to him, ideally one who can also stretch the floor."

O’Donnell’s previous selection: Duke C Wendell Carter at No. 7.

Mohamed Bamba, C, Texas

ESPN’s Jonathan Givony, No. 5 overall pick (April 9): "With Nerlens Noel unlikely to be in Dallas’ long-term plans and Dirk Nowitzki turning 40 in June, the Mavs will definitely be looking for a frontcourt player to build around.

"Bamba’s rare combination of length, shot-blocking instincts and offensive promise gives him one of highest ceilings of any prospect in this draft. Every team in the NBA is looking for a big man who can anchor a defense."

Givony’s previous selection: Duke C Wendell Carter at No. 6.

Bleacher Report’s Jonathan Wasserman, No. 5 overall pick (April 3): "The Dallas Mavericks have been noncommittal with Nerlens Noel and could look at Mohamed Bamba to anchor their defense.

"Bamba has the potential to change a game with his length in the paint like Rudy Gobert, and he’d give Dennis Smith Jr. an enormous finishing target at the rim, where he shot 74.5 percent.

"At Texas, he flashed glimpses of an over-the-shoulder game and jump shot, but those are the skills he’ll have to improve, along with his body.

"Michael Porter Jr. will get consideration, but between the back surgery and poor performances after returning to Missouri, Dallas should feel more confident in Bamba’s unique defensive presence."

Wasserman’s previous selection: Real Madrid G/F Luka Doncic at No. 1.

Fan Rag Sports’ Daniel O’Brien, No. 5 overall pick (March 30): "The Longhorns’ one-and-done center is a risk-reward commodity, especially on the offensive end. His possible range of outcomes is vast on that end. On defense, however, his floor is high and his ceiling is astronomical.

"He averaged 4.8 blocks and just 3.4 fouls per 40 minutes this season, and opponents scored just 89.7 points per 100 possessions when he was on the floor. His mobility and long reach form a wall around the rim unlike any other prospect.

"The Mavericks will be targeting him high, but he shouldn’t be considered an immediate savior. He will need a couple of years of growing pains before he starts approaching his prime."

O’Brien’s previous selection: Duke F Marvin Bagley III at No. 5.

UPROXX’s Brad Rowland, No. 7 overall pick (March 12): "Bamba is the final player in my top tier and the Mavs may get a steal here. Injuries (and a mediocre Texas team) have kept Bamba out of the national spotlight but his absurd length draws comparisons to Rudy Gobert in terms of defensive ceiling and he isn’t a stiff on the other end either."

Sporting News’ Chris Stone, No. 5 overall pick (Feb. 13): "With a 7-9 wingspan, Bamba has the physical tools to one day be the NBA’s Defensive Player of the Year. He averages 5.4 blocks per 40 minutes for Texas and deters a significant number of shots around the rim for the nation’s fifth-ranked defense. There are some questions about his focus and intensity, but none about the ability."

"On the offensive end, Bamba could help the Mavericks establish a formidable pick-and-roll attack alongside Dennis Smith Jr. The Texas freshman has an impressive catch radius and would force help defenders to make difficult decisions as he crashes towards the rim. He’s even flashed a bit of shooting range with a slow-loading jumper."

The Ringer’s Jonathan Tjarks, Kevin O’Connor and Danny Chau, No. 5 overall pick (March 2): "This is a conspiracy. Tjarks clearly selected Jackson with the fourth pick just so Bamba could fall to his hometown team. As an athletic lob threat and rim protector with a 9-foot-6 standing reach, Bamba is a perfect fit for Rick Carlisle’s offensive system. Dennis Smith repeatedly running high pick-and-rolls with Bamba would be pretty freaking invigorating. If Bamba’s perimeter shot translates, he could end up the best player in the draft."

CBS Sports’ Reid Forgrave, No. 6 overall pick (March 22): "I believe every player in this mock draft, one through six, and maybe even later, would have been the top-rated player in last season’s draft. While the 2017 draft was marked by its depth, this draft is marked by its stacked top. Porter was my top pick in the preseason. The back surgery makes him too much of an injury risk to take over the handful of other guarantees in this draft, but Porter’s ceiling is high, high, high. Maybe not Kevin Durant, but Porter is a natural scorer. Think of him in the mold of Jayson Tatum, just a tick more talented, a tick bigger, a tick better of a scorer. You could even toss in a little bit of Dirk here. I’ve heard some people say that since Porter’s two-game return from back surgery in March was so disappointing, NBA general managers will knock him for it. That’s nonsense. Scouts have seen Porter’s dynamic offensive game for years; they’re not going to judge him poorly for two subpar collegiate games when he didn’t appear quite physically ready to return."

Forgrave’s previous selection: Michigan State C Jaren Jackson Jr. at No. 7.

Yahoo Sports’ Jordan Schlutz, No. 5 overall pick (April 6): "The youth movement continues for the Mavs. Jackson, a 6-10 jumping jack, is an ideal complement to Dennis Smith Jr. because of his dexterity, quickness and ability to pick-and-pop. As a freshman, he connected on 40 percent of his threes, and his defensive flexibility is a huge plus for a Dallas team that lacks an identity."

The Athletic’s Sam Vecenie, No. 4 overall pick (March 28): "Jackson was pretty awful in both of Michigan State’s NCAA Tournament games (by his lofty standards). He averaged four points, six rebounds and a block, and displayed some of the general weaknesses that give scouts pause when evaluating him. While his feel on the defensive end is quite strong, his offensive feel isn’t quite there yet. He struggles with double teams and turnovers, and isn’t a natural passer. Still, he’s the best defensive prospect in the class as a shot-blocking savant, he knocks down shots from distance with terrific touch and he’d fit nicely with Dallas as it transitions out of the Dirk Nowitzki era and into something new under Rick Carlisle."

Vecenie’s previous selection: Real Madrid G/F Luka Doncic at No. 2.

CBS Sports’ Gary Parrish, No. 7 overall pick (March 15): "Sexton’s Crimson Tide took a bad turn late and closed the regular season on a five-game losing streak that put their NCAA Tournament hopes in real jeopardy. But it would be foolish to suggest Sexton is the main issue — though him missing 15 of his 17 3-point attempts in that stretch, and lowering his 3-point percentage to 30.6 on the season, was both problematic for Alabama and enlightening for NBA front offices. Nobody questions the 6-3 point guard’s athleticism or aggressiveness — and it was on display in the final seconds of Alabama’s win over Texas A&M in its SEC Tournament opener. But his inability to consistently take over games at this level, and consistently make shots, is a slight source of concern."

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Mavericks mock draft roundup: Could Dallas end up with a star big man from Texas or Duke?

Barring something crazy happening, the Mavericks will have a high lottery pick for the second straight year. Dallas selected Dennis Smith Jr. with the No. 9 pick in last year’s draft and should get another talented prospect to pair with him in this draft.

If the Mavs continue at this pace, they should have a top five pick. Check out where the Mavs stand in the lottery race right here.

Here’s a breakdown of where draft experts think the Mavs will pick in this year’s draft and who they might select.

Luka Doncic, G/F, Real Madrid

The Big Lead’s Jason McIntyre, No. 3 overall pick (March 8):"The hype machine will be in overdrive for months ahead of the draft, and it wouldn’t shock me if Doncic went 1st overall. The Mavericks have an awful roster, among the worst in the league. They’ll be right back here next year barring something lucky in free agency, but Doncic will contend for ROY and be the best scorer on the team."

NBADraft.net, No. 5 overall pick (March 29)

NBADraft.net’s previous selection: Duke F Marvin Bagley III at No. 3.

Marvin Bagley III, F, Duke

Sports Illustrated’s Jeremy Woo, No. 5 overall pick (April 3): "Should Bagley fall here he’d offer strong value, and would be a fascinating frontcourt complement to Dennis Smith in Dallas. He was picked apart by critics as the season went on, but Bagley’s athleticism, offensive potential and rebounding ability give him a strong upside. He can be a ball-watcher on defense and his interior play can be predictable, but at some point there’s no sense looking past his production. Bagley’s best NBA position is probably going to be power forward, but he will need to keep improving as a jump shooter to make that happen. He’s still a very good prospect, and deserves some patience."

Woo’s previous selection: Missouri F Michael Porter Jr. at No. 7.

SB Nation’s Ricky O’Donnell and Matt Ellentuck, No. 4 overall (March 28): "Bagley is so skilled at scoring around the basket. He was unstoppable with one-on-one coverage all year, using a variety of tricks to average 20 points per game in his true freshman season for Duke.

"The question is whether he blocks enough shots to be a center or has the type of perimeter game the modern four now demands.

"A bet on Bagley comes with the idea that he’s just scratching the surface of his skill level. He’s shooting 36 percent from three-point range on 50 attempts this season, but he’s only a 62-percent free-throw shooter. You can see the outline of a playmaking big man who can attack off the dribble for himself and others, but his feel and handle are still developing.

"Finding the right team will be as important with Bagley as any prospect. Bagley is not a shot blocker and he doesn’t have strong defensive instincts right now. He needs a defensive anchor next to him, ideally one who can also stretch the floor."

O’Donnell’s previous selection: Duke C Wendell Carter at No. 7.

Mohamed Bamba, C, Texas

Bleacher Report’s Jonathan Wasserman, No. 5 overall pick (April 3): "The Dallas Mavericks have been noncommittal with Nerlens Noel and could look at Mohamed Bamba to anchor their defense.

"Bamba has the potential to change a game with his length in the paint like Rudy Gobert, and he’d give Dennis Smith Jr. an enormous finishing target at the rim, where he shot 74.5 percent.

"At Texas, he flashed glimpses of an over-the-shoulder game and jump shot, but those are the skills he’ll have to improve, along with his body.

"Michael Porter Jr. will get consideration, but between the back surgery and poor performances after returning to Missouri, Dallas should feel more confident in Bamba’s unique defensive presence."

Wasserman’s previous selection: Real Madrid G/F Luka Doncic at No. 1.

Fan Rag Sports’ Daniel O’Brien, No. 5 overall pick (March 30): "The Longhorns’ one-and-done center is a risk-reward commodity, especially on the offensive end. His possible range of outcomes is vast on that end. On defense, however, his floor is high and his ceiling is astronomical.

"He averaged 4.8 blocks and just 3.4 fouls per 40 minutes this season, and opponents scored just 89.7 points per 100 possessions when he was on the floor. His mobility and long reach form a wall around the rim unlike any other prospect.

"The Mavericks will be targeting him high, but he shouldn’t be considered an immediate savior. He will need a couple of years of growing pains before he starts approaching his prime."

O’Brien’s previous selection: Duke F Marvin Bagley III at No. 5.

UPROXX’s Brad Rowland, No. 7 overall pick (March 12): "Bamba is the final player in my top tier and the Mavs may get a steal here. Injuries (and a mediocre Texas team) have kept Bamba out of the national spotlight but his absurd length draws comparisons to Rudy Gobert in terms of defensive ceiling and he isn’t a stiff on the other end either."

Sporting News’ Chris Stone, No. 5 overall pick (Feb. 13): "With a 7-9 wingspan, Bamba has the physical tools to one day be the NBA’s Defensive Player of the Year. He averages 5.4 blocks per 40 minutes for Texas and deters a significant number of shots around the rim for the nation’s fifth-ranked defense. There are some questions about his focus and intensity, but none about the ability."

"On the offensive end, Bamba could help the Mavericks establish a formidable pick-and-roll attack alongside Dennis Smith Jr. The Texas freshman has an impressive catch radius and would force help defenders to make difficult decisions as he crashes towards the rim. He’s even flashed a bit of shooting range with a slow-loading jumper."

The Ringer’s Jonathan Tjarks, Kevin O’Connor and Danny Chau, No. 5 overall pick (March 2): "This is a conspiracy. Tjarks clearly selected Jackson with the fourth pick just so Bamba could fall to his hometown team. As an athletic lob threat and rim protector with a 9-foot-6 standing reach, Bamba is a perfect fit for Rick Carlisle’s offensive system. Dennis Smith repeatedly running high pick-and-rolls with Bamba would be pretty freaking invigorating. If Bamba’s perimeter shot translates, he could end up the best player in the draft."

CBS Sports’ Reid Forgrave, No. 6 overall pick (March 22): "I believe every player in this mock draft, one through six, and maybe even later, would have been the top-rated player in last season’s draft. While the 2017 draft was marked by its depth, this draft is marked by its stacked top. Porter was my top pick in the preseason. The back surgery makes him too much of an injury risk to take over the handful of other guarantees in this draft, but Porter’s ceiling is high, high, high. Maybe not Kevin Durant, but Porter is a natural scorer. Think of him in the mold of Jayson Tatum, just a tick more talented, a tick bigger, a tick better of a scorer. You could even toss in a little bit of Dirk here. I’ve heard some people say that since Porter’s two-game return from back surgery in March was so disappointing, NBA general managers will knock him for it. That’s nonsense. Scouts have seen Porter’s dynamic offensive game for years; they’re not going to judge him poorly for two subpar collegiate games when he didn’t appear quite physically ready to return."

Forgrave’s previous selection: Michigan State C Jaren Jackson Jr. at No. 7.

The Athletic’s Sam Vecenie, No. 4 overall pick (March 28): "Jackson was pretty awful in both of Michigan State’s NCAA Tournament games (by his lofty standards). He averaged four points, six rebounds and a block, and displayed some of the general weaknesses that give scouts pause when evaluating him. While his feel on the defensive end is quite strong, his offensive feel isn’t quite there yet. He struggles with double teams and turnovers, and isn’t a natural passer. Still, he’s the best defensive prospect in the class as a shot-blocking savant, he knocks down shots from distance with terrific touch and he’d fit nicely with Dallas as it transitions out of the Dirk Nowitzki era and into something new under Rick Carlisle."

Vecenie’s previous selection: Real Madrid G/F Luka Doncic at No. 2.

CBS Sports’ Gary Parrish, No. 7 overall pick (March 15): "Sexton’s Crimson Tide took a bad turn late and closed the regular season on a five-game losing streak that put their NCAA Tournament hopes in real jeopardy. But it would be foolish to suggest Sexton is the main issue — though him missing 15 of his 17 3-point attempts in that stretch, and lowering his 3-point percentage to 30.6 on the season, was both problematic for Alabama and enlightening for NBA front offices. Nobody questions the 6-3 point guard’s athleticism or aggressiveness — and it was on display in the final seconds of Alabama’s win over Texas A&M in its SEC Tournament opener. But his inability to consistently take over games at this level, and consistently make shots, is a slight source of concern."

Wendell Carter, C, Duke

ESPN’s Jonathan Givony, No. 6 overall pick (March 20): "The Mavs could certainly use help in the frontcourt, and Carter’s basketball IQ and versatility are promising in a number of ways. He is a physically mature big man with a 259-pound frame and a 7-foot-3 wingspan, which will allow him to play the center position in the NBA with ease.

"He is a polished player with excellent hands and touch around the basket and has demonstrated a nice blend of passing, shot-blocking and perimeter shooting, despite being overshadowed at times by fellow big man Marvin Bagley III."

Givony’s previous selection: Missouri F Michael Porter Jr. at No. 7.

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